Home of the The Hall of Ma'at on the Internet
Home
Discussion Forums
Papers
Authors
Web Links

July 15, 2024, 2:46 am UTC    
February 14, 2022 10:34PM
JonnyMcA Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Over the last number of decades there has been a
> debate over the cause of the Extinction event 66
> Million years ago (the so called Cretaceous
> Tertiary (K-T) extinction event as it was known,
> or the Cretaceous Palaeogene (K-P) extinction
> event as it is now being referred to due .). The
> two main arguments was whether it was caused by a
> large 10km asteroid/comet impact, or whether it
> was caused by massive volcanism of the Deccan
> Traps.
>
> Some research suggests that the dinosaurs were in
> already in decline leading, but surviving right up
> to the K-P event. Conclusively it was the K-P
> event that was the critical horizon. Recent
> research demonstrates that the Deccan traps began
> erupting around 67.4 Million years ago, and again
> around 66.1 million years ago , lasting into the
> Palaeogene (which on geological scales means it
> was practically a continuous event across the K-P
> boundary). The asteroid impact has been dated to
> around 66.04 million years ago.
>
> Some research published in 2020 now suggests that
> in actual fact, the Deccan traps may have reduced
> the climatic effects of the asteroid impact (see
> [www.pnas.org]).
> The impact would have caused abrupt, prolonged
> severe climate cooling (an impact winter) lasting
> many years (estimates vary from a few years to a
> decade), but that carbon dioxide released by the
> Deccan Traps volcanism caused a global warming
> effect, which helped reduce the effect of the
> impact. The point made was that the extinction
> event could have been a lot worse if not for the
> concurrent volcanism at the time.
>
> The debate as to the cause of the extinction event
> has swung back and forth, and will probably still
> continue to do so, but the general consensus is
> that it was the Asteroid impact that ultimately
> caused the relatively sudden extinction event.
>
> I am not entirely sure what you mean by "explosion
> of gravitational spheres". I presume this is due
> to translation, and you are perhaps referring to
> supernova, i.e. exploding stars that sometimes
> leave behind compact gravitational objects like
> Neutron stars or black holes (or another type of
> supernova which is an exploding compact white
> dwarf star). IN either case, a close enough
> supernova could cause an increase in cosmic
> radiation and cause an extinction event. This was
> once considered as a mechanism for the K-P
> extinction, but given the extent of evidence of a
> large asteroid impact, the supernova hypothesis is
> no longer considered to be the cause.
>
> So long story short. current thinking is Asteroid
> impact most likely caused the K-P extinction
> event, Volcanoes did not, but they may or may not
> have contributed.
>
> Jonny


Very interesting. You really knows what you are saying.
I am very impressed

Cintia Panizza
———————————

"Happiness is only real when shared."
Christopher McCandless
Subject Author Posted

Was an asteroid really the cause of the extinction of life on Earth 66.038 million years ago?

Cintia Panizza February 01, 2022 09:41PM

Re: Was an asteroid really the cause of the extinction of life on Earth 66.038 million years ago?

Hermione February 02, 2022 06:33AM

Re: Was an asteroid really the cause of the extinction of life on Earth 66.038 million years ago?

Cintia Panizza February 14, 2022 10:26PM

Re: Was an asteroid really the cause of the extinction of life on Earth 66.038 million years ago?

Byrd February 02, 2022 06:03PM

Re: Was an asteroid really the cause of the extinction of life on Earth 66.038 million years ago?

JonnyMcA February 10, 2022 12:02PM

Re: Was an asteroid really the cause of the extinction of life on Earth 66.038 million years ago?

Cintia Panizza February 14, 2022 10:34PM



Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login